Greenhouse gases in the Earth system: setting the agenda to 2030


Shows ground-based sampling stations that measure both atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentration (magenta symbols) or CO2 only (cyan symbols). Measurements made via an in situ continuous analyser, or discrete flask sample collection (usually weekly or fortnightly) followed by analysis in a central laboratory. All stations shown are presently running and collect data at, or close to, the WMO/GAW quality control specifications for these species. Aircraft and shipboard measurements are not shown.

Shows ground-based sampling stations that measure both atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentration (magenta symbols) or CO2 only (cyan symbols). Measurements made via an in situ continuous analyser, or discrete flask sample collection (usually weekly or fortnightly) followed by analysis in a central laboratory. All stations shown are presently running and collect data at, or close to, the WMO/GAW quality control specifications for these species. Aircraft and shipboard measurements are not shown.

What do we need to know about greenhouse gases? Over the next 20 years, how should scientists study the role of greenhouse gases in the Earth system and the changes that are taking place? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society scientific Discussion Meeting in London on 22–23 February 2010, with over 300 participants.

The journal “Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society” of the UK has published an entire issue with about 18 articles describing various issues concerning greenhouse gases. Click here for the “Table of Contents”

An partial overview article from Reuters via Scientific American is here: “Scientists want climate change early-warning system”

LONDON (Reuters) – A better monitoring network for greenhouses gases is needed to warn of significant changes and to keep countries that have agreed to cut their emissions honest, scientists said in papers published Monday.

“What we’re hoping to do is see if the warming is feeding the warming, particularly in the Arctic,” said Euan Nisbet, a specialist in methane emissions at the University of London.

“Our monitoring network is very, very limited. We feel more observation is needed.”

Such measurement could warn of possible climate tipping points, scientists said in papers published by Britain’s science academy, the Royal Society.

The data also could be used to verify countries’ reporting of greenhouse gas emissions against targets under the present Kyoto Protocol and a possible successor after 2012.

The Earth’s climate in the past has changed in a relatively short period of time, warming rapidly about 12,000 years ago at the end of the most recent glacial period. …

Continue reading for a list of the various papers included in the journal, with links to the abstracts.

Here is a list of the titles; click on each title to link to the abstracts. Go to the “Table of Contents” for links to read the entire article online or download PDF versions.

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One Response to Greenhouse gases in the Earth system: setting the agenda to 2030

  1. chemistry says:

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